British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

C&D&M Ltd
DUBBIN
PROTECTIVE No1
(Broad arrow mark)
2.oz

Manufactured by Carr & Day & Martin after 1923. With a domed and rolled edge lid, this container is unprinted, plain embossed tin plate.
British army dubbin
Photo: Geoff Robinson

British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

PROTECTIVE No1 C&D&M Ltd
(Broad arrow mark)
DUBBIN
2 oz

Manufactured by Carr & Day & Martin after 1923. The straight-lidded container is unprinted, plain embossed tin plate.
Dubbin No 2
Photo: Sean Foster

British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

PROTECTIVE No1
(Broad arrow mark)
DUBBIN
2 oz
C. D & M Ltd
13 MB

Manufactured by Carr & Day & Martin after 1929. The rolled-edge lidded container is very dark green with embossed text on the lid.
The tin itself was manufactured at Metal Box Company’s factory of E. C. Barlow & Sons, Palmers Green, London (Barlows became part of Metal Box in 1929).
British Army dubbin
Photo: David Pratt

British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

(Broad arrow mark)
DUBBIN
PROTECTIVE No1
2.oz
C.P. Ltd

This somewhat battered tin is printed in black (including the ‘broad arrow’ mark) on a gold ground and is complete with unused contents. The thick, clear, dark brown grease smells slightly of wax/vaseline. The C.P. Ltd is most likely to be the Canadian company Capo Polishes Limited.
Dubbin Protective No 1
Photo: David Pratt

Dubbing (Mold prevention type)

On the label

1½ ounce net.
Dubbing (Mold prevention type)
This is a terneplate container not to be used as a food container.
Directions for use
Clean shoes thoroughly. Apply at about 70°F. Rub in well. Frequent light coatings are better than one heavy coating. Dry shoes at temperature no higher than body heat.

Note: “Terne Plate” is a coating that consist of 80% Lead and 20% Tin, an excellent coating for corrosion protection. The finish of terne plate is not as bright as Tin coat but has a slight reflective finish. The high lead content is the reason for the health warning. This product is US Army issue. Similar tins were used to contain wood alcohol for use for personal food heating. There was also an anti-chemical warfare version ‘Impregnate, shoe, M1’ that sealed boots against vesicants.

The contents of this tin are now a stiff, somewhat crystalline wax.
army dubbing
Photo: David Pratt

British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

Protective No 1
(Broad arrow mark)
Dubbin
2. oz
Cat No H.A.13530
J.W.H.&S.LTD, HULL

Embossed text on prise-off lid. Post WW2 British Army Protective No. 1 Dubbin
No clue yet to the manufacturer, J.W.H. & S. LTD, Hull. It is believed the catalogue number places the date at post-WWII, and indicates a product type/specification. The flat green tin towards the bottom of this page carries the same catalogue number.
British army dubbin protective
Photo: Martin Clewlow

Dubbin protective

On the label

Dubbin protective
2oz nett
293/15/111 (Con.15.c.)
.C.L.

The contents of this tin is now a stiff clear dark golden grease, usable with warmth and effort!
British army Dubbin protective
Photo: David Pratt

British dubbin Protective No. 1

On the label

Cat No H.A.13530
Dubbin Protective No 1
2oz

An olive green tin with black print and was used by all services.
Instructions for the application of Dubbin Protective No.1 were:
1. All mud and dirt has first to be removed with a damp cloth and then the boot wiped dry.
2. The dubbin is to be applied evenly over the whole of the uppers, including the tongue.
3. The dubbin is to be worked well into the boot by hand, with particular attention paid to the seams and to the join of the upper and the welt

Note: This tin packaging was almost certainly produced by the packaging division of Joseph Pickering & Son Ltd, Sheffield – it is exact in every detail to those used in the Pickering’s range of webbing restorers – and places it’s date to the 1953/4 or later. It is believed the catalogue number system came in post-WWII, and indicates a product type/specification. The squat green tin further up this page carries the same catalogue number.

British army Dubbin Protective No 1
Photo: David Pratt


This example of dubbin in a plain olive drab tin is thought to be Dutch.
Dutch dubbin
Photo: Martin Clewlow



This page was last updated: 13th September 2014